The Jerome and Hazel Tobis Fellows were established in 2010 to honor the professional integrity, concern for social justice, and humanitarianism of Jerome Tobis, a founding member of the Ethics Center. Tobis Fellows will be awarded to young scholars including nontenured junior faculty, post-doctoral students, and post-baccalaureate students -- who are beginning their careers and are concerned with moral issues as they construct their own professional lives. The honorific fellowships offer an intellectual community, involvement in scholarly projects with other Ethics Center faculty, and professional mentoring for those interested in ethical concerns in any of the fields represented at the Ethics Center.  Interested applicants should send a description of themselves, with their GPA, major, minor and school along with a 2 paragraph description of their substantive interests to Marilu Daum at daumm@uci.edu. We have rolling admissions and, in general, we collect the applications and evaluate them in April. Candidates who are accepted as Tobis Fellows for the next academic year are notified in May. If spots remain available, late admissions are sometimes made.
Contributions to the Tobis Fellowship program may be made via the e-giving link (at left on website) or directly to Sylvia Lotito, Center Manager, Social Science Plaza A, UCI, Irvine, CA 92697. 

Tobis Fellow Lina Kreidie chosen as Fulbright Scholar

2016 Tobis Fellows

SENEM CEVIK

SENEM BAHAR CEVIK

Interested to bridge the gap between public diplomacy and political psychology through the use of identity narratives. The project will aim to introduce sensitivity and empathy approaches in public diplomacy practice that will help foster relationship building between parties in conflict and in turn can provide tools for effective communication.

LYNDSEY CHRISTOFFERSEN

LYNDSEY CHRISTOFFERSEN

Interested in human trafficking, immigration, gender issues, and community collaboration. As a Tobis Fellow at the Center, she will be writing the book "After Slavery: Stories of Survival After a Life in Human Trafficking". As cofounder of the Long Beach Human Trafficking Task Force and member of the City of Long Beach Violence Prevention Plan Steering Committee; her works centers on understanding how local communities address global issues such as human trafficking.

 ANDRADA COSTOIU

ANDRADA COSTOIU

Centered on immigration policy and its contextual formation. I analyze the federal-state variations and tensions and try to expand the knowledge on how local political, social and cultural factors determine states to follow a certain approach in dealing with their immigrant populations. I am also interested in the differences in the immigration policies of different regime types (authoritarian regimes, developed and transitional democracies).

 

FABIOLA GUZMAN 

I am interested in being a part of the Tobis Fellowship and I am currently investigating the influence positive facial expressions have on cheating behavior. I have reviewed relevant literature on morality and cheating behavior and would love to have the opportunity to explore the field of moral psychology by doing my own research on this topic. I am particularly interested in researching altruism in cancer patients.

KONG HAIE

KONG HAIE
Interested in further understanding the research status of social gender in America, continue the research on the Chinese rural women who flow urban and will focus on the changes of life practice, family role, self-consciousness, life experience of rural females brought by globalization and industrialization and how the changes take place. To learn some American's teaching methods which I can share with my colleagues and students after I return to China

Angeliki Kavanou

ANGELIKI KAVANOU

My research interests are informed by my conviction that peace does not start when agreements are signed but only when conditions of structural violence are addressed and eliminated.

Lina Kreidie

LINA KREIDIE

To understand the impact of PTSD on social and political behavior, this study will utilize a social psychological approach with a focus on cognition in defining conflict, we will highlight how PTSD affects the individuals' memory of the incident; their level of bias to the other, their perceptions of themselves and the other, and how emotions- not only at time of crisis but way after the trauma- supersede reasoning and is conducive to conflictive behavior.

Ramona Martinez

RAMONA MARTINEZ
I will be continuing independent work I developed as a 2016 summer intern at the UCI Ethics Center. More specifically, I will be researching psychological hardiness (resilience) and orientation to challenge amongst introverts and those of a more sensitive constitution. My goal is to have more nuanced understanding of how introverts negotiate novel experiences and to build a more personalized toolkit in helping them address environmental stressors. I will be conducting this research in affiliation with the hardiness laboratory.

Clint McKenna

CLINT MCKENNA

Interested in emotional and social contexts influence moral decision making. As a Tobis fellow, he hopes to use experimental and data-driven approaches to investigate how states of emotion influence an individual's decision-making processes. He hopes that his work will contribute to the literature in moral psychology and inform policy decisions relevant to ethics.

Christina Ong

CHRISTINA ONG

Interested in the impacts of colonialism and cultural appropriation on short-term international service trips and development aid. She also has an interest on the intersection of national identity and ethnic identity as it applies to social movements. As a Tobis Fellow at the Center, she will be studying ethical forms of service trips abroad and holistic social justice education. Christina will also be working with the Center for Citizen Peacebuilding on developing the Global PEACE (Peace Education and Community Engagement) Program, a short-term study abroad trip that fosters peacebuilding and social justice education through service learning.

 Nicholas Shroeder

NICHOLAS SCHROEDER
Interested in virtue ethics/virtue theory, moral conflict, and the role of the emotions in ethical deliberation.

Mary Smirnova

MARY SMIRNOVA

Interested in how positive emotion can influence moral decision-making. As a Tobis Fellow at the Center, she will be conducting research on how smiling, which has been linked to positive emotion through previous research, will influence cheating behavior. She will run participants in a laboratory and examine the mechanism behind the influence of positive emotions on cheating by looking at physiological measures (e.g., heart rate and skin conductance).

 Katrin Travouillon

KATRIN TRAVOUILLON

Focusing on the development and conceptualization of international-local relations in the context of interventions, her work contributes to the debate over legitimacy in peacebuilding missions. Her post-doctoral research centers on a collection of letters the Cambodian people wrote to the United Nations Transitional Authority in the early 90s. During her fellowship she will work on her current book project, which explores mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in public political discourse during the Cambodian intervention.

 

2015 Tobis Fellows

SENEM CEVIK

SENEM BAHAR CEVIK

Interested to bridge the gap between public diplomacy and political psychology through the use of identity narratives. The project will aim to introduce sensitivity and empathy approaches in public diplomacy practice that will help foster relationship building between parties in conflict and in turn can provide tools for effective communication. 
SCOTT BROWN
SCOTT BROWN

I’m primarily interested in: social psychology, human sexuality, abnormal disorders, ethics, and politics. I have some experience in politics as an intern for the Democratic Party of Orange County. I also occasionally watch political news shows. I’m fascinated by the bad behaviors that some politicians perform. One might expect politicians to watch their behavior. However, sometimes I think the power that comes with certain positions leads a person to feel invulnerable. I think the Stanford Prison Experiment is a good example of where power can lead a person astray. A person may make a poor moral choice because of being caught up in the power and control they have. 

LYNDSEY CHRISTOFFERSEN


 

LYNDSEY CHRISTOFFERSEN
Interested in human trafficking, immigration, gender issues, and community collaboration. As a Tobis Fellow at the Center, she will be writing the book “After Slavery: Stories of Survival After a Life in Human Trafficking”. As cofounder of the Long Beach Human Trafficking Task Force and member of the City of Long Beach Violence Prevention Plan Steering Committee; her works centers on understanding how local communities address global issues such as human trafficking.
ANDRADA COSTOIU





ANDRADA COSTOIU
Centered on immigration policy and its contextual formation.  I analyze the federal-state variations and tensions and try to expand the knowledge on how local political, social and cultural factors determine states to follow a certain approach in dealing with their immigrant populations. I am also interested in the differences in the immigration policies of different regime types (authoritarian regimes, developed and transitional democracies).
DAN FARACI




DAN FARACI
Interested in how positive emotion affects moral decision-making. Moral decisions can be considered utilitarian (i.e., maximizing utility) or deontological (i.e., considered “wrong” as opposed to “right”). As a Tobis Fellow, Dan will be investigating the mechanisms behind the influence of positive emotion on moral decision-making and also exploring the ways in which positive emotion influences people to choose one ethical approach over another (i.e., utilitarian vs. deontological).
LIANA GHEORMA




LIANA GHEORMA
Excited to have the opportunity to investigate further the issue of gender inequality in academia and the gender confidence gap.
ANGELIKI KAVANOU




ANGELIKI KAVANOU
My research interests are informed by my conviction that peace does not start when agreements are signed but only when conditions of structural violence are addressed and eliminated.  
ELIZABETH KOPPE




ELIZABETH KOPPE
Interested in ethical leadership, secular ethics (as discussed by the Dalai Lama), and “post-heroic” leadership, developed into a curriculum by the Dalai Lama Fellows (DLF) organization. As a Tobis Fellow at the Center, she will be interviewing current Dalai Lama Fellows, the curriculum advisors for DLF, and the staff of DLF, in order to examine its curriculum and its broad-reaching implications for social innovators and social entrepreneurs. 
LINA KREIDIE




LINA KREIDIE
To understand the impact of PTSD on social and political behavior, this study will utilize a social psychological approach with a focus on cognition in defining conflict, we will highlight how PTSD affects the individuals’ memory of the incident; their level of bias to the other, their perceptions of themselves and the other, and how emotions- not only at time of crisis but way after the trauma- supersede reasoning and is conducive to conflictive behavior. 
STELLA LIU





STELLA LIU
To build empathy with the elderly experience by interviewing the Baby Boomer generation on how they dealt with loss, career, love, family, milestones, and aging. The silver wave of this older generation is filled with fascinating, unique stories that have tales of events, sometimes historic, that not everybody can learn from a textbook in school or in the news. We want to connect other Baby Boomers with what their generation is currently going through while also bridging the young and the old over the roller coaster of lessons, tears, and happiness that comes with life.
CLINT MCKENNA





CLINT MCKENNA
Interested in emotional and social contexts influence moral decision making. As a Tobis fellow, he hopes to use experimental and data-driven approaches to investigate how states of emotion influence an individual’s decision-making processes. He hopes that his work will contribute to the literature in moral psychology and inform policy decisions relevant to ethics.
CHRISTINA ONG





CHRISTINA ONG
Interested in the impacts of colonialism and cultural appropriation on short-term international service trips and development aid.  She also has an interest on the intersection of national identity and ethnic identity as it applies to social movements.  As a Tobis Fellow at the Center, she will be studying ethical forms of service trips abroad and holistic social justice education.  Christina will also be working with the Center for Citizen Peacebuilding on developing the Global PEACE (Peace Education and Community Engagement) Program, a short-term study abroad trip that fosters peacebuilding and social justice education through service learning.
KAYLA SCHNEIDER-SMITH





KAYLA SCHNEIDER-SMITH
Interested in positive, humanistic, and personality psychology, as well as holistic healing. She also is a poet who seeks to understand how people create meaningful narratives of their lives.

Mary Smirnova

MARY SMIRNOVA
Interested in how positive emotion can influence moral decision-making. As a Tobis Fellow at the Center, she will be conducting research on how smiling, which has been linked to positive emotion through previous research, will influence cheating behavior. She will run participants in a laboratory and examine the mechanism behind the influence of positive emotions on cheating by looking at physiological measures (e.g., heart rate and skin conductance).

Teresa Spezio

TERESA SPEZIO

Practicing environmental engineer and historian who studies the intersection of science, environmental policy and sustainability from an interdisciplinary perspective.  As a Tobis Fellow at the Center, she will be working on her book project. Beginning with the 1987 publication of the landmark United Church of Christ-funded study Toxic Wastes and Race, she will explore how decision makers and US Environmental Protection Agency scientists confronted ideas of environmental justice in the era of lower detection concentrations and emerging human health and ecological risk assessment techniques.  

Crystal Trejo

CRYSTAL TREJO
Crystal is interested in the various tracks women take to balance work and family pursuits and how workplace policies affect those choices.  As a Tobis Fellow at the Center, she will look at maternity leave policies: their history, their various goals and intended effects, and the variation that exists among sectors and between different countries. Through an examination of workplace policies, US laws, and existing studies about maternity leave, she will compile a list of best practices and maternity leave recommendations for small, medium, and large companies.
 

2014 Tobis Fellows

ANDRADA STEFANIA COSTOIU

Andrada
I have obtained my Masters in Political Science in December 2008 and I am currently completing a Ph.D. in Political Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago with a specialization in International Relations and Comparative Politics. I am on schedule to defend my dissertation for December 2014 graduation.  My thesis analyzes the parliamentary debates and the bills on immigration in United States, at the federal and state levels; it highlights and explains important differences between states’ political, historical, social and cultural aspects and their approach on immigration.
My current research, as my thesis suggests, is centered on immigration policy and its contextual formation.  I analyze the federal-state variations and tensions and try to expand the knowledge on how local political, social and cultural factors determine states to follow a certain approach in dealing with their immigrant populations. I am also interested in the differences in the immigration policies of different regime types (authoritarian regimes, developed and transitional democracies).  
DANIEL DRISCOLL
cid:part1.06080900.08060204@uci.edu
Daniel graduated from the University of Redlands with a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies and Minor in Religious Studies.  
 
Daniel is interested in environmental ethics and politics, the effective communication of sustainability issues, and the foundations of environmental stewardship.  
As a Tobis Fellow, Daniel is interviewing ‘Environmental Exemplars’ -- people who give substantially of themselves to environmental causes through philanthropy, volunteerism, protest, endorsements, education, the arts, celebrity status, sustainable living, and more.
LIANA GHEORMA

I have recently graduated with a Bachelor's degree in Psychology, with Distinction in General Scholarship from the University of California, Berkeley, where I volunteered as a research assistant in the Berkeley Personality lab and in the Berkeley Social Interaction lab. 
 
As a Tobis fellow, I am excited to have the opportunity to investigate further the issue of gender inequality in academia and the gender confidence gap under Professor Kristen Monroe’s guidance.

LINO IGLESIAS

I am interested in exploring moral improvement, in particular moral effort, meaning how and why we perform a good moral act, and what processes this involves. I believe moral effort and moral acts define who we are and reveal the human person.

Moral effort plays a role in this process; there is a certain effort in understanding and recognizing how to become more human. Does this effort depend on genetics, on intellectual capabilities, on receptiveness to others, on one´s tendency to search for the truth? Also, there is an effort involved in taking good moral actions. In order to achieve those actions we often have to overcome certain obstacles. How does this effort depend on our psychological temperament? And how does it depend on external factors like education or risk in our lives? What is the role of habit?

Seeing moral effort along a timeline we could break it down into two phases: the moment of decision, or action, and the inner process leading to the moment of decision. The moment of action has primacy in our moral life, but effort appears throughout the whole process.

ANGELIKI KANAVOU

During her year as Tobis Fellow, Angeliki Kanavou will be analyzing survey data and will be working on:

a) the long term social adaptation of survivors and perpetrators of the Cambodian Genocide, and

b) on inter-generational memory transmission between parents and young adult children in Cambodia.  

My research interests are informed by my conviction that peace does not start when agreements are signed but only when conditions of structural violence are addressed and eliminated.  

RUSSELL KERR 

Russell KerrRussell Kerr is exploring the meaning of sexuality and gender in the developing world. He is particularly interested in conceptions of gender and sexuality for those people who undergo forced migration in Southeast Asia. He has spent time living in Southeast Asia and worked for an NGO helping refugees attempting to resettle in Thailand.

Through the lens of his own experiences he hopes to build on his existing short stories to examine the moral, ethical, political, and philosophical ramifications for those with nontraditional sexual and gender identities who are migrants in Southeast Asia and the world. His research and writing asks the question: what can be learned from the subjugation and empowerment of oppressed peoples?

Russell Kerr graduated from Bard College in upstate New York.  When he isn’t writing and reading, you can find him running on the beach. Russell is a native of Newport Beach and is seriously enjoying post-­‐baccalaureate life.

 TAMIR MAGAL

Tamir Magal served as a Research Fellow at the Davis Institute at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, after completing his PhD in political science at Haifa University in 2013. Dr. Magal's research agenda concerns the role of civil society and social movement organizations in processes of conflict transformation and peacemaking in the context of intractable conflicts. His latest project examined the effect of different types of identity discourse on the vision of future peace espoused by disparate peace organizations. Distinguishing between organizations with nationalist and moral aspects of collective identity discourse, the study compared their differing visions regarding the future image of peace. The study demonstrated the importance of a morally universal worldview in predicting an elaborated vision of peace.

During his period as a Tobis fellow at the Center for Ethics and Morality Dr. Magal intends to complete several publications regarding the role of peace organizations in the Israeli-Palestinian context. Furthermore, he would examine the resonance of peace organizations' vision, identity, and activities in the Israeli public discourse - through general and online media.

2013 Tobis Fellows

EMILY HOWEL

Emily Howell received her B.A. in May 2013 from Harvard College, where she studied the History of Science and Earth and Planetary Sciences.  During her senior year there, Emily had the opportunity to work with Professor Kristen Monroe, who was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.  With Professor Monroe, Emily helped conduct research on gender equality in academia and why so few women reach full professorship as compared to men -- especially in the STEM fields and at the most prestigious universities where women are half of the student body.  So far the research has helped produce a paper recommending policies and culture changes universities and departments can enact to make academia a more productive environment for women, minorities, and all faculty that balance family and work.  This paper will be published in a political science journal this spring. 

Emily is excited to continue research with Professor Monroe this year as a Tobis Fellow.  The research team is building off of interviews with men and women students and faculty, as well compilations of different universities’ work-life and tenure policies and data on successful policies, to write a book on gender equality and how academia can achieve it.  Emily hopes the work will help students, faculty and administration recognize the biases that still shape our expectations and practices in an academic setting, as well as how we understand and interact with each other as individuals.  Ultimately, she hopes this helps schools institute structural and cultural changes that ensure women and minorities’ brain power doesn’t go to waste.

Emily Howell begins her graduate work in environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in the fall of 2014. 

2012 Tobis Fellows

CAITLIN DUNCAN

Originally from Seattle, Caitlin Duncan moved to California and received her bachelor of art’s degree in Cognitive Neuroscience from Scripps College in Claremont, CA in 2011. A year traveling abroad and domestically that involved conversations with many different physicians and academics, Caitlin decided to pursue a combination of clinical and academic work. Early this year she began an emergency department Scribe program at St. Joseph’s hospital which involves shadowing a physician and documenting that physician’s patients’ courses of care in the emergency department during that physician’s shift. This experience inspired her to study the art of medicine through the patient-physician relationship, which prompted her Tobis Fellowship course of inquiry. After over 6 months of full time work in the hospital Caitlin is now focusing her time on researching the art of medicine and how the patient-physician relationship has ethical and scientific implications. Caitlin is also a research assistant for a neuroscience study in the Behavioral Biology department at the California Institute of Technology. Caitlin plans on going back to school to finish pre-requisites for medical school in fall 2013 with hopes of pursuing a career that combines research and clinical treatment in neuroscience and medicine.

ANNE BIRGITTA PESSI

I am an Academy Research Fellow, a researcher in Religion and Social Studies, at the University of Helsinki, Finland. I am currently on maternity leave from the Collegium for Advanced Study, and have been nominated a professor (from January 2014 onward) at the Theological Faculty, in the same university.

My research interests cover altruism, pro-social behavior, social capital and solidarity, as well as humanitarian and social activities of religious institutions. Already my PhD, from 2004, concerned volunteer motivation and particularly the role of religiosity in volunteering, also in activities outside religious communities. Overall, I am interested in – and have published rather vastly on – the manifold connections of altruism, good life, and spirituality in individual experiences, and in institutions and communities such as churches and NGOs, as well as in the perspective of entire society. Lately I have been intrigued by issues, such as, the meaning of a church community to individuals with privatized religiosity, and what is the role of the ethics and social service of church institutions? A very different example; I have recently explored a shopping center project (a chapel and a priest working in the mall) of one local congregation in Finland from the perspective of communication: what was the message that the parish wanted to send out to people, and what messages the people received.

I have been involved in various international comparative research projects, such as WREP (Welfare and Religion in European Perspective) that included eight European countries, and WaVE (Welfare and Values in Europe) that included 12 European countries. I have also directed an Academy of Finland funded research project RiTS (Religion in Transforming Solidarity, years 2008-2011) that involved seven researchers. At the moment I also work in a large research network of almost 20 countries from all over the world that focuses on student volunteering (values, motivations, CV usage, etc), directed by prof. Femida Handy and Ram Cnaan from the US.

I have truly enjoyed not only working as a research for all my adult life but particularly working on such fascinating topics – topics that are theoretically and conceptually intriguing but also (and very much so) practically important. These are the elements of the good life of both individuals and societies, I believe. Thus, besides conducting research I have found it crucial to spread the word about these themes; I have, e.g., often lectured in NGOs and appeared in the Finnish media. I believe researchers need to be involved also in the praxis of promoting a better society for all!

It will truly be an honor to part of the Ethics center, even if only for a period of 2-3 months (October-December 2013). I will be eager to get to know colleagues working on similar related topics. Besides networking my aim as a visiting fellow in autumn 2013 will be to work on four particular issues:

  • Editing a book titled Morality and Christianity; an edited volume including mostly articles by European fellows, based on a seminar I, together with two colleagues, arranged in 2011. The book will be published by Brill.
  • Putting the finishing touches on a book titled Solidarity – Theory and Praxis; an edited volume including articles from both Europe and the States (including prof. K. R. Monroe), based on a seminar I, together with a colleague, arranged in 2010. The book will be published by Lexington Books.
  • Working on a single-authored journal article on altruism and Christian social practice, particularly from the viewpoint of our view of human beings, and the implications these views have on training of, e.g., social workers.
  • Working on a single-authored journal article on the experiences of the sacred, and the role of altruism in these experiences, by Finns. The data of this article includes 1.150 open-ended replies.

Also, while at the UC Irvine, I will be planning and working on a recently launched comparative project (three countries: Finland, the US, and Russia) on self-help literature and the role of spirituality both in their content and in reception. This project studies bestselling self-help books and the ways in which readers engage with this cultural technology in the above mentioned countries. It examines the conceptions of the self and the ‘good life’ put forward in this context, and how they are marked by gender, class and nationality. The project draws on three sets of data. First, it consists of a selection of bestselling self-help literature published in Finland and Russia during the 2000s (altogether 45 books). Second, the project draws on written reader stories by Finnish self-help readers (n=25) and one-to-one and focus group interviews with readers in Finland (collected in autumn 2013 – spring 2014) and in Russia (n=31, collected in 2009). Third, a cross-cultural reception study of how 2nd year sociology students interpret Rhonda Byrne’s worldwide bestseller Secret will be carried out through focus group interviews in Russia, Finland and the US in 2015. The Russian data of the project has been already collected and largely analysed, and accordingly, the project focuses on collecting and analysing the Finnish and US data. My aim is thus to return to the States in (2014 or) 2015 to collect comparative data. Concerning the US colleague for this project, and the university for the data collection, we already have some ideas and possibilities but Irvine would be great (and indeed greater!) option.

2011 Tobis Fellows

NICHOLAS LAMPROS

Nicholas Lampros graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles in the spring of 2008 with high honors (3.831 GPA) and Phi Beta Kappa in English and creative writing. As a Tobis Fellow, Nicholas has collaborated on several academic articles focusing on the intersection of personal, professional, and ethical lives; two of these articles are included in the edited volume Science, Ethics, and Politics: Conversations and Investigations, currently in press at Paradigm Press and due for release in 2011. Most recently, Nicholas helped produce a short book, Of Ethics and Economics: Conversations with Kenneth Arrow, a book that attempts to dig into the ethical side of economics and make sense of the economic collapse of the 2008 and the ensuing political upheaval. As a fellow at the Ethics center, Nicholas will continue his work on Of Ethics and Economics, helping to take it to the final steps of publication.  He also will continue his own personal work, including the completion of several short fiction stories that include complex ethical issues.  Nicholas hopes to combine in a more meaningful way his creative work with his academic interests, examining what exactly constitutes fiction in an increasingly virtual world, and what psychological and ethical impulses drive some to virtual worlds and artificial social networks while others remain more rooted in the “real world” (whatever that means).  He will examine the existing literature on the psychology of fiction and the anthropology of virtual worlds, a project he hopes will result in a combination of creative work and analysis.

If you are interested in Nicholas’s work, or in supporting it in any way, please contact him at nlampros@gmail.com.

ANDRADA STEFANIA COSTOIU
Andrada Stefania coutoiu is a Romanian student, raised in Bucharest during the days of the dictator, Nicholas Cseausescu. After emigrating to the United States, Andrada studied at the University of Illinois. Now Andrada a doctoral candidate at the University of Illinois, Chicago Circle, Andrada is working on a dissertation that addresses Eastern European immigration and political participation. Her thesis advisor at the University of Illinois is Doris Graber. While at the Ethics Center, Andrada will be working with Professor Monroe on this topic and on a project on altruism which explores the cross-cultural roots of altruism and asks how culture and political institutions influences our basic drive to help others.Andrada’s CV is attached. If you are interested in Andrada’s work, or in supporting it in any way, please contact her at acosto1@uci.edu.

 JAMES VAN SLYKE

James Van Slyke, PhD. is assistant professor of psychology at Fresno Pacific University and his research focus is in the areas of psychology of religion, moral psychology, and religion & science.  His first book was The Cognitive Science of Religion (Ashgate Press, 2011) and he also co-edited a book entitled Theology and the Science of Moral Action: Virtue Ethics, Exemplarity and Cognitive Neuroscience (Routledge Press, 2012).  He is completing a co-edited volume on sexual selection theory and religion entitled The Attraction of Religion: Evolutionary Theories of Religion (Bloomsbury Press, 2014) and recently contributed a chapter entitled Moral Psychology, Neuroscience, and Virtue: From Moral Judgment to Moral Character in the edited collection, Virtues and their Vices (Oxford University Press, 2014). He has also published articles in Zygon and Theology & Science and is a Tobis Fellow at the UCI Interdisciplinary Center for the Scientific Study of Ethics and Morality.  

 


THE TOBIS MEDAL AND THE JEROME AND HAZEL TOBIS DAY

The UCI Ethics Center is pleased to announce the inauguration of an annual Jerome and Hazel Tobis Day and the Tobis Medal.

TOBIS DAY

The Jerome and Hazel Tobis Day will be held once a year to honor the life, achievements and contributions of Jerry and Hazel Tobis. We will coordinate the Tobis Day so it occurs on the day of the Annual Awards Banquet, usually held in early June. The precise details of the Tobis Day may shift over time but current plans are to:

  • Host a luncheon to honor the Tobis Fellows on the day of the Annual Awards Banquet;
  • Ask each past Fellow who can attend to do so and give a short presentation noting what the Fellow did while at UCI, what the Fellow is now doing, and suggesting how the participation in the Tobis Fellows program helped that person. Fellows who cannot attend will be asked to prepare and send a short video recording or Skype in to present their progress report. These reports will be available on the web and will be played at the Tobis luncheon. We will add to these each year;
  • Honor the new and current Tobis Fellows and ask them to attend the luncheon – with their families or guests if they so wish – to discuss what they plan on doing or what they have done as Tobis Fellows;
  • Foster the spirit of giving back to your community by encouraging – although certainly not requiring – Tobis Fellows to consider eventually making some kind of contribution to the Tobis Fellow Fund after they leave UCI and their time as a Fellow has ended.
  • THE TOBIS MEDAL
  • Each year we will select one – five people who have lived their lives in the spirit of Jerry Tobis, by achieving in their field but also by giving back to their society in some way – and giving these people the Tobis Medal at the Awards Banquet. We will use the afternoon of the Tobis Day to have the current Tobis Fellows and the Director – plus whatever Center faculty and friends wish to attend – participate in oral histories of the lives of the Tobis Medalist honorees. These oral histories will be filmed and transcribed for safekeeping in the Center’s Vaughn Archives.  Each Tobis Medalist will be given a copy of the oral history. Eventually some of these oral histories might be published in a book whose theme would be how one person can make a difference in the world.
2016 TOBIS MEDALIST HONOREES 
Rohida Khan
2015 TOBIS MEDALIST HONOREES
Francisco Ayala
George Berci
2014 TOBIS AWARDS (You Tube video)
2014 TOBIS MEDALIST HONOREES
David Dennis
David Easton
Tom Tierney
Elizabeth Tierney
Bettye Vaughen 

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